Dalyan: A hidden gem in the Aegean region of Turkey. Dalyan is a small town located on the southwestern coast of Turkey, in the Muğla province. Dalyan is known for its natural beauty and rich history. Dalyan draw visitors from around the world with ancient ruins and stunning landscapes. One of the most popular attractions

The Dalyan Radar Hill Walk:

The walking route in Dalyan starting from Dalyan – Iztuzu Beach Road and ending nine kilometres away at Radar Hill is a walk which supplies breath-taking views. You will reach one of the four lakes of Dalyan delta, the Sulungur Lake after a short hike on the rocks around a small canyon when you turn to the west at the water tank after passing Gökbel, which is on the 7th kilometre of the Dalyan-Iztuzu road.

Although no ruins of architectural samples dated to before the century have survived, many graves were found during once 16th foundation excavations in the present town of Dalyan. Evid of a large cemetery indicates that there was once a deep-rooted and large settlement here. Another known fact is that in Dalyan, Turks and Greeks lived together until 1924, as is the case with many other coastal settlements of Anatolia.

After Turkish tribes invaded all the Christian lands to the north of Caria in the 1300s, Caunos experienced a severe population decline resulting from the economic implosion of maritime trade. Additionally, a malarial epidemic brought the city to its knees and it was finally abandoned. When the ancient city was heavily damaged by earthquakes, it was covered with earth that then grew a dense vegetation, hiding it from view. Eventually two new settlements budded within the vicinity.

Iztuzu and the Dalyan Gate is the magnificent final of the Köycegiz – Dalyan ecosystem and the place where the Dalyan River meets the Mediterranean. The threshold of this strait is the Delik Island that rises opposite to the Dalyan Gate and is covered with pine trees and scrub. Having a pier and a lighthouse at the side facing the Iztuzu beach, the Delik Island was a point of bearing showing sailors of the antiquity the entrance to the port of Caunos.

Yes, the delta is chaotic, but this incredible land that is in constant flux, reshaped by the divine order, inspires feelings of awe and joy. There are four lakes worthy of exploration, the first of these Sülüklü lake, was once the port of ancient Caunos, and the life blood of its economy. This busy harbour was frequented by the tilted-nosed, square-sailed ships of antiquity and was according to Strabo ‘protected with a chain across its entrance when necessary’.

The fish trap gate opens into an entirely new world. Here begins the Delta where the reeds spread out into a 1700 hectare area, massing like an enormous straw field that roots down to a brackish bed. The contours of the Delta are drawn by the reeds that filter the water through its roots providing a haven for small shrimps (crangon crangon). The young fish function as an important part of the ecosystem, moving like clouds as they travel together. Looking from above, you see this meandering chaos that lacks any describable shape.

Boats travelling from Dalyan to the Iztuzu Beach pass through the gate of a fish trap constructed of gauze stretched between poles, so as to block the fishes from one side to the other. A “Dalyan” in fishing terms, is controlled by a watchman’s post, before boats enter the delta’s labyrinth of reed islets and complicated waterways. It is customary to salute the fish trap watchman while going in and out of this gate, which is sunken below to provide passage for the boats and raised back in place immediately after the boat has passed.

he town of Dalyan has a history that probably dates back to the 13th century, but which received it’s status technically speaking during Süleyman the Magnificent’s Rhodes campaign. More recently, about 30 to 40 years ago, this settlement turned village was almost exclusively dependent on agriculture and fishing for its sustenance.

The birth of a unique ecosystem consisting of Köycegiz Lake, the Dalyan River and Delta and the Iztuzu Beach is part of an ancient and great tale concerning the formation of the earth’s crust that started in the Mesozoic Era, 251 millon years ago, and continues today with the changes caused by terrestrial forces.

The argument that has been going over the Iztuzu Beach between Oruc Travel (Ramazan Oruc) and Mugla University and People of Dalyan has ended by Minstry’s order to gendarme to remove Oruc Travel from the Iztuzu Beach immediately. Counsellor of Ministry Mr. Mustafa Ozturk has send a notice to Mugla Governors Office with the signature

The argument that has been going on since May 11th 2016 as Oruc Travel has invaded the facilities in the beach regarding the management rights to Iztuzu Beach. They had claimed that the right of management of the facilities at the beach were granted to them in 2014 and that they had court order regarding

District Governor of Ortaca has delivered the notification regarding the ownership of the Iztuzu Beach belonging to Mugla Sitki Kocman University to DALCEV (Oruc Travel) DALCEV representatives were notified by the District Governor of Ortaca, with the court order that the management rights of the Iztuzu Beach belongs to Mugla Sitki Kocman University. As per

Dalyan Çevre Geliştirme Turizm İnşaat Emlak ve Otel A.Ş. (DALCEV)’s claim to have the management rights over Dalyan’s Iztuzu Beach and their attempt to put their personal belongings in one of the huts in the beach has roused a new argument. Tuesday night, a group of people whom claim to be “The Men of DALCEV” (The

Mugla Municipality has adapted new and advanced techniques to combat mosquitoes that is both effective and environmentally safe. The municipality has been effectively working and says that will continue working 12 months a year program to fight with the mosquitos and other harmful insects. Teams have been busy all winter taking effective precautions by spraying places

Is it safe to go to Turkey? Is there a war in Turkey? Would i jeopardise safety of my family if we holidayed in Turkey? How safe is Dalyan?

Yes, you read it right. If visiting Turkey this summer or ever is in your holiday agenda, you should hear what i have to say and think twice before you jump on that plane. And oh, if you are not planning to come to Turkey for any reason or if the thought had never crossed your mind, you should read this post to the end so you know what you are not missing.

I finally arrived home this morning around 5.30 am after a long journey from Istanbul. I have been gone since I left Dalyan on Christmas Eve and went to Istanbul to meet with my lovely friends Alan and Sunny from Scotland and my brother Leigh and his lovely lady Sandra from England.

Dalyan will be home to International Likya Dalyan Open Waters Swimming Competition. Interest in participating in the competition is rising every day. More than 100 swimmers has enrolled for the competition since enrolment started in February 1st. Organised by Likya Dalyan Sports Club and supported by Ortaca Municipality, the competitions will be organised in “We

Bringing Service to Mugla Foundation held a sealed bid for operating a ferry on Dalyan River between Dalyan and Candir villages and Dalyan Boats Cooperation has won the bid. With this project the two sides of Dalyan will be connected with a ferry service that will allow cars and tractors cross to the other side of

Dalyan, meaning of natural fish farm, is a truly “Eden on Earth” small town located in Mugla province of Southwestern Turkey. Unlike other busy nearby resorts like Marmaris or Fethiye, it is still not excessively developed and life runs at small pace. Dalyan town owes its preserved nature mostly to its millions of years old habitants Caretta

Greater City of Muğla Dalyan is a town in city of Muğla in Turkey. There are 81 cities in Turkey and 30 of these are “Big City Municipalities” with population more than 750,000. Muğla is one of the big city municipalities and its governmental structure is managed accordingly. There are 13 counties in Muğla. These are: